Breadcrumbs

Associate Professor Kevin Collier

Associate Professor (Biological Sciences)

Qualifications: BSc Waikato PhD Canterbury

Research Interests

Large river ecology, Restoration of urban streams, and methods for monitoring stream health.

Research Supervised

PhD

  • Pingram, Michael (2014). Food webs in the lower Waikato River and the role of hydrogeomorphic complexity.

MSc (Research)

  • Catlin, Alicia (2015). Does reduced floodplain inundation affect larval fish food supply? Zooplankton-whitebait interactions in the lower Waikato River.

MSc

  • Garrett-Walker, Jeremy (2014). The ecology of constructed ponds on the lower Waikato River floodplain: implications for waterfowl management.
  • Valler, Tammy (2013). Three Hamilton urban catchments: a comparison of ecosystem condition.
  • Johnston, Toni (2011). Comparison of riparian willows and riprap as habitat for fish and invertebrates in the Waikato River.
  • Ginders, Melany (2011). The influence of connectivity on the functional role of a natural and re-constructed side-arm in the lower Waikato River.

Recent Publications

  • Collier, K. J., Pingram, M. A., Francis, L., Garrett-Walker, J., & Melchior, M. (2018). Trophic overlap between non-native brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and native shortfin eel (Anguilla australis) in shallow lakes. Ecology of Freshwater Fish, 10 pages. doi:10.1111/eff.12400

  • Shell, T. M., & Collier, K. J. (2018). Partitioning of macroinvertebrate communities in a large New Zealand river highlights the role of multiple shore-zone habitat types. River Research and Applications, 10 pages. doi:10.1002/rra.3344

  • Collier, K. J., Garrett-Walker, J., Özkundakci, D., & Pingram, M. A. (2018). Characteristics of consumer trophic resources for Waikato shallow lake food webs. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, (Special issue: Lake resilience: Linking theory and management), 16 pages. doi:10.1080/00288330.2018.1517098

  • Hicks, B. J., Kusabs, I., Duggan, I., Collier, K., & Quinn, J. (2017). The use of a traditional Māori harvesting method, the tau kōura, for monitoring kōura (freshwater crayfish) populations. In Crazy and Ambitious Conference, National Science Challenges. Conference held at Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand.

View All research publications by Kevin Collier

Contact Details

Email: kcollier@waikato.ac.nz
Room: R.2.16
Phone: +64 7 858 5169