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Research Areas

Research is one of the main priorities of Waikato's Faculty of Science & Engineering. Our research is diverse and our teaching based on the latest research. There are numerous active research areas within the Faculty:

Advanced Materials

We aim to build up unique and world-class expertise in developing novel processes for producing advanced materials and near net shape components and in developing high performance structural and functional materials.

We also aim to develop advanced materials and related technologies that can be utilised by New Zealand Industry.

Advanced materials is a multidisciplinary research area comprising academics from both the School of Science and the School of Engineering

Find out more about the Waikato Centre for Advanced Materials (WaiCAM).

Academic staff researching in this area:
Deliang Zhang
Michael Mucalo
Brian Nicholson
Kim Pickering
Janis Swan

Analytical Chemistry

The department is extremely well-equipped for research in all areas of analytical chemistry including gas and liquid chromatography and a variety of forms of mass spectrometry. In addition NMR spectroscopy is available for characterization of, for example, toxins. Typical areas of interest include water quality (both inorganic and organic contaminants), tracking pollutants in the environment, fate of herbicides and pesticides in the environment, characterisation of biological toxins and tracking of antibiotics in the environment.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Alistair Wilkins
Merilyn Manley-Harris

Animal Behaviour

Animal Behaviour is the study of patterns of behaviour in animals, including humans, and of how the behaviour of individuals helps to determine the density and distribution of populations.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Joseph Waas
Carolyn King
Pawel Olszewski

Animal Physiology

Animal physiology looks at the principles behind how animals function. How does a muscle contract? How does a bat fly? How does a butterfly smell its mate? How does a cow turn grass into milk? And why does your blood pressure rise, your hands become sweaty and your pupils dilate under certain circumstances?

Physiologists record electrical activity in nerves and muscles and the eye, measure digestive secretions and movements, determine blood pressure and respiratory rates, and assess endocrine function. These studies help our understanding of how the body regulates and co-ordinates its activities, responds to stress, and adjusts to varying environments.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Nick Ling
Pawel Olszewski

Antarctic - Soils and Environment

Antarctic research is co-ordinated through Antarctica New Zealand. All Antarctic expeditions form part of the official New Zealand Antarctic programme. Each expedition produces an immediate science report, which is distributed by Antarctica New Zealand. Much of our current Antarctic research is undertaken in collaboration with Landcare Research or relates to impacts of human activities on the Antarctic environment.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Megan Balks
Dave Campbell

Applied Optics

Novel optical technique and instrument development to measure physical, chemical, biological or medical parameters relevant to current industry requirements.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Rainer Künnemeyer

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the explanation of life in molecular terms. Life can be considered to be a range of complex interactions between molecules. Biochemistry is the study of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids which are the fundamental molecules of life. Biochemists try to understand the characteristics of these molecules and how they interact in living organisms. Such studies are fundamental to all of biology.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Peter Molan
Roy Daniel
Roberta Farrell
Craig Cary
Ryan Martinus
Vic Arcus

Botany

Botany is the study of all aspects of plants. Botany encompasses the structure of plants from simple mosses to trees, the evolution of plants, how they are organised into communities and how they function and reproduce. It includes ecosystem level functioning, and both conservation and exploitation management. Plants are important because they effectively provide the energy supply for all communities on Earth.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Bruce Clarkson
Michael Clearwater
Chrissen Gemmill
David Hamilton

Cell & Molecular Biology

Cell and Molecular Biology is the study of the machinery by which cells and whole organisms function. It involves combining Genetics, Biochemistry and Cell Biology in order to elucidate how the information in genes can result in the production of proteins that can control the metabolic reactions in cells and the growth and development of all living organisms. As well as revolutionising fundamental biology, many findings in cell and molecular biology have important applications in medicine, biotechnology, conservation biology and forensics.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Richard Wilkins
Ray Cursons
Ryan Martinus
Hugh Morgan
Roberta Farrell
Craig Cary
Vic Arcus
Pawel Olszewski

Climate & Environmental Change

Studies of how climates and environments have changed are dictated by time scale: very long-term change is measured in millions of years, long-term change in hundreds or tens of millennia, short-term change in millennia, and very short-term change in centuries or decades. Studies of environmental change over the last 2.5 million years are usually referred to as Quaternary science. Documentation and analysis of modern environments and processes typically span a few years or decades.

Research at Waikato University and especially within Earth & Ocean Sciences covers all these timescales and is wide-ranging, dealing with both marine and terrestrial deposits of many different kinds. Marine studies are based on the analysis of sediments in deep-sea cores, and terrestrial studies include research on long sedimentary sequences, loess deposits, pyroclastic and volcanic deposits including tephrochronology, lake and peat deposits, cave deposits, glacial materials, and paleosols.

Academic staff researching in this area:
David Lowe
Chris Hendy
Willem de Lange
Peter Kamp
Cam Nelson

Coastal Marine Science

Marine and freshwater resources and ecosystems are now recognised as ranking among the world's most valuable assets. Managing these resources wisely is a key challenge in the 21st century. New Zealand has jurisdiction over a maritime area that is 24 times the size of its land mass, yet relatively little is understood about this area's resources and capacity.

The Coastal Marine Group (CMG) is a specialist niche operator in shallow water mapping and surveying, meeting the needs of researchers, managers,and developers of New Zealand’s marine and water resources. The group contains a mix of established and emerging researchers supported by outstanding technical personnel, and offers contract research, collaborative research, consultancy, survey work, monitoring programmes, data analysis and interpretation and shallow water mapping.

Some of the group are based at the Coastal Marine Field Station in Tauranga.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Chris Battershill
Karin Bryan
Conrad Pilditch
Willem de Lange
Julia Mullarney
Vicki Moon
Craig Cary
Steve Bird
Nick Ling

Composite Materials

The Composites Research Group carries out research into natural and synthetic fibre composites. Key themes include property optimisation, fracture mechanics and sustainability.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Kim Pickering
Johan Verbeek
Brian Gabbitas
Yuanji Zhang

Computational Chemistry

My research involves the use of high performance computing to solve a broad range of problems of chemical interest. Some of my current research projects involve simulating chemical reactions in the atmosphere and the design of nanoporous materials for carbon dioxide capture.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Joseph Lane

Coordination & Organometallic Chemistry

Coordination and organometallic chemistry of the platinum group metals and gold, with an emphasis on complexes with S and N donor ligands. Studies on the metalloligands [Pt2(mu-E)2(PPh3)4] (E = S, Se) using an electrospray mass spectrometry-directed synthetic approach. Chemistry of ferrocene-phosphines and -arsines.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Bill Henderson
Graham Saunders

Cortical Modelling

Since late 1997, our Waikato Group has been modelling the abrupt change in brain state that occurs when a patient falls into anaesthetic unconciousness. We believe that there is strong evidence that the sudden awake → asleep switchover is closely analogous to a physical phase transition, rather like water freezing to form ice.

Our aim is to develop a physics-based model to help us better understand the nature of anaesthetic unconsciousness. With this greater understanding comes the possibility of improved patient safety - one seeks to reduce the nightmarish risk of inadequate anaesthesia in which the patient is paralyzed yet still conscious.

We are also modelling the cortical processes that underlie the 90-minute cycles of natural sleep. We are particularly interested in the abrupt transition between deep slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and the possible implications that the slow, correlated fluctuations in brain voltage might have for memory, learning and erasure.

The Waikato staff work in collaboration with Professor Jamie W. Sleigh (Professor of anaesthetics and intensive care at Waikato Hospital), who has been putting people to sleep for years. Prof Sleigh provided the original motivation to model the awake → asleep switchover as a physics phase transition.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Moira Steyn-Ross
Alistair Steyn-Ross
Marcus Wilson

Ecosystems - Antarctic

There are two major ecosystems in Antarctica. Perhaps the best known, and perhaps the most extreme in the world, is the extreme terrestrial system with the extensive snow and glaciers and a very small amount of bare land. The land is permanently inhabited only by mosses, lichens, algae and microscopic animals with the largest being insects, - springtails. The largest ice-free area in Antarctica is the Dry Valley's near Ross Island, possibly the driest place in the world.

The second major ecosystem is the sea, one of the more productive seas in the world because of the algae that lie under the extensive sea ice and provide food for the krill, fish, seals and whales. The sea ice grows by 18000000 square kilometres each winter, twice the area of the United States. The environment under the ice is one of the most stable in the world and changes in temperature by only a few tenths of a degree throughout the year. Linking these two environments are the seals and penguins that breed on ice-free coastal sites in the summer months and transfer nutrients from the sea to the land.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Craig Cary
Chrissen Gemmill
Roberta Farrell
Ian Hogg
Nick Ling

Ecosystems - Freshwater

Freshwater ecosystems are the inland waters of the world, including lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands. The study of freshwater ecosystems includes investigations of their physical and chemical structure, the plant, animal and microbial populations that comprise them, and the interactions among these components. Freshwater ecosystem studies include the conservation and management of freshwater resources, as well as the structure and function of the communities.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Nick Ling
David Hamilton
Brendan Hicks
Ian Hogg
Ian Duggan
Craig Cary

Ecosystems - Marine

Marine Ecosystems examines the distribution and abundance of marine organisms, and how these organisms carry out basic functions such as feeding, metabolism, and reproduction in the marine environment. This knowledge leads to understanding of the processes and factors controlling populations, which is critical to their conservation and sustainable management.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Conrad Pilditch
Brendan Hicks
Ian Hogg
Craig Cary

Ecosystems - Terrestrial

Terrestrial ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. For example, ecologists may document environmental changes, such as deforestation, and observe the consequences for animals that are adapted to forest life and can live no-where else, such as the native long-tailed bat. Where communities have been damaged, applied ecologists study ways to restore what was lost, such as transferring birds to new, predator-free homes.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Bruce Clarkson
Roberta Farrell
Carolyn King
Craig Cary

Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry can broadly be described as the chemistry of reactions occurring at the interface between a solution (“electrolyte”) and a solid (“electrode) when it is driven by an external voltage in an electrical circuit containing this interface.

Dr Mucalo's interests lies primarily in the area of “Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry” which is where infrared spectroscopy, a molecular fingerprinting technique, is used to identify what chemical species are being created during electrochemical reactions. Before the ascension of this technique, this direct molecular fingerprinting had not been possible with the conventional techniques in use.

Research is being carried out on the corrosion of various metals in aqueous or non-aqueous media containing unusual chemical species using this technique to see whether any interesting compounds may turn up in the process.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Mucalo

Electronics

Areas of research interest are:

  • Sensor applications
  • Medical instrumentation
  • Line scan imaging
  • Optical metrology and sensing
  • 3D Time-of-Flight imaging systems and applications (Check out the Chronoptics website)
  • Biophotonics
  • Optoelectronic instrumentation
  • Analog electronics
  • Mechatronics
  • Embedded microcontrollers
  • Microwave and millimetre-wave circuits
  • Instrumentation and metrology
  • Audio and acousitcs
  • Linearity and distortion
  • Network Analysis and Vector Correction
  • Compound Semiconductor and wide-bandgap circuits
  • RF systems
  • Supercapacitor applications
  • Surge protection
  • Power conditioning
  • Sensor applications
  • New power supply topologies
  • High voltage application for nutrition extraction from fruit skins
  • Electronics Design and building of electroporators

Academic staff researching in this area:
Jonathan Scott
Howell Round
Sadhana Talele
Nihal Kularatna
Adrian Dorrington
Michael Cree
Rainer Kunnemeyer

Engineering Education

The Waikato Engineering Education Research Unit has the objective of improving learning outcomes for engineering students. Its members come from the Faculty of Science & Engineering and the Faculty of Education. Collaborative research projects carried out by members of the Unit are designed to develop insights and expertise for curriculum innovation and teaching in engineering education.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Ilanko Ilanko
Rainer Künneymeyer
Kim Pickering
Jonathan Scott
Janis Swan
Rob Torrens
John Williams
Marcus Wilson

Environmental Chemistry

The School of Scienceis extremely well set up for environmental chemistry, many aspects of which overlap with the description of analytical chemistry.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Chris Hendy
Alistair Wilkins
Merilyn Manley-Harris

Exploratory Synthesis

Synthesis and investigation of coordination and organometallic compounds, in particular of fluorinated ligands, to develop new synthetic methodologies, reactivities and catalytic properties. The use of fluoroarene-arene interactions to control solid state structures and properties. Development and investigation of extremely hydrophobic surfaces, especially on industrially important metals.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Graham Saunders

Genetics

Genetics is literally, "the study of heredity". In the past, geneticists studied mutation, selection and evolution in microbes, plants and animals. These days they also indulge in "genomics" which makes use of computers and large databases of DNA and protein information to research both genes and gene function. Genetic variation can be applied to the study of populations, for conservation, and to reconstructing evolutionary relationships.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Chrissen Gemmill
Roberta Farrell
Ray Cursons
Craig Cary
Linda Peters
Steve Bird

Geochemistry

Academic staff researching in this area:
Chris Hendy

Geomechanics

Coastal cliff erosions - mechanisms, erosion rates, hazard assessment; volcanic edifice stability -geotechnical characterisation and stability analysis; geotechnical properties of soft (weak, weathered, altered) rocks; properties of volcanic soils - sensitive rhyolitic soils, weathered tephras, alluvial sediments; soil erosion from earthworks - mechanisms, measurements, prediction

Academic staff researching in this area:
Vicki Moon

Honey

Honey is the focus of the Bees n Trees project, a large collaborative group which includes representatives of industry, horticulturalists and collaborators in Australia and Thailand. The focus of this research is mānuka honey in particular the specific properties of mānuka and other Leptospermum trees, which give rise to the chemical precursor of the bioactivity in honey. Other aspects of research include a study of the kinetics of conversion of the precursor in maturing honey.

The Honey research area is multidisciplinary and comprises academics from Biological Sciences, and Chemistry.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Merilyn Manley-Harris
Peter Molan
Alistair Wilkins
Ray Cursons
Michele Prinsep
Pawel Olszewski

Hydrology

Surface and ground water resources, hydropower optimisation, ecohydrology and evaporation.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Earl Bardsley
Dave Campbell

Industrial Energy Efficiency

The Industrial Energy Efficiency Group was formed in 2002, up to which point there had been no research capacity in New Zealand in the area of industrial energy efficiency.

The Waikato and central North Island regions are the centre of industrial processing in New Zealand for the dairy, and pulp and paper sectors, and much of our research is focused on these and associated industries.

The Group's aim is to save megawatts and petajoules of energy through improved industrial processes, technology integration and plant reliability.

Find out more about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Group's work

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Walmsley

Land & Water Resources

This research grouping covers a wide range of disciplines including soil science, geomechanics, hydrology, and the analysis and management of natural hazards.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Megan Balks
Earl Bardsley
Roger Briggs
Dave Campbell
David Lowe
Vicki Moon

Materials Chemistry

Areas of materials chemistry being researched include:

  • the use of cattle bone to make bone replacement materials for human and veterinary applications.
  • controlled release drug/nutrient delivery where active drugs or nutrients are incorporated into a matrix which is designed to release the substance of interest slowly over a period of time for steady delivery of the substance either to human or animal subjects.
  • the synthesis and characterisation of metal nanoparticles, a thoroughly topical area of research at the moment which falls under the theme of “nanotechnology”.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Mucalo

Mechanical Engineering

Research in Mechanical Engineering at Waikato is based around the four core disciplines:

  • Engineering design
  • Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer
  • Engineering mechanics and vibrations
  • Materials and solid mechanics

Our research activities aim to deliver practical outcomes of value to New Zealand industries.

Our current research activities include:

  • Building integrated solar energy systems
  • Sustainable transport systems, NZECO commuter vehicle
  • Modelling of free vibrations in plates using the Rayleigh-Ritz method
  • Small portable fuel cells
  • Titanium alloys for the automotive industry

Academic staff researching in this area:
Mike Duke
Brian Gabbitas
Sinniah Ilanko

Medical Physics

Areas of research interest include:

  • Monte Carlo simulation in radiotherapy and imaging
  • Medical physics professional issues
  • Radiotherapy dosimetry and instrument development
  • EEG signal processing
  • Theoretical and computational modelling of the brain to understand the mechanisms of anaesthesia, natural sleep and seizure genesis
  • Computer Vision
  • 3D Range Imaging
  • Medical Imaging
  • Electroporation modelling and its therapeutic applications

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Cree
Howell Round
Alistair Steyn-Ross
Moira Steyn-Ross
Sadhana Talele

Microbiology

Microbiology is the study of micro-organisms; how we can identify and culture them, how they live, how some infect and cause disease in plants and animals and how we can make use of their activities. Micro-organisms are crucial to ecosystem functioning. Microbiologists work typically with bacteria and fungi. Microbiology is an important component in Biotechnology.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Ian McDonald
Hugh Morgan
Roberta Farrell
Ray Cursons
Craig Cary
Vic Arcus

Natural Product Chemistry

Natural Products or secondary metabolites, are produced by organisms via specialised biosynthetic pathways and are nonessential for life. Natural products are of interest for many reasons, such as their unusual chemical structures and biological activity (ability to affect the physiology of other organisms).

Dr Prinsep's research on natural products at Waikato involves investigation of marine and freshwater organisms to discover novel compounds, ideally with interesting bioactivity such as anticancer or antimicrobial activity. This utilises chromatographic techniques such as reversed phase and size exclusion chromatography and analytical and structural elucidation techniques such as mass spectrometry (in several forms) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Prof Wilkins’ recent research interests include the isolation and structural eludication of natural product terpenoidal, indole alkaloid based mycotoxins and marine algal toxins using 400 and 600 MHz one and 2D-NMR, GC-MS and LC-MSn techniques.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michele Prinsep
Alistair Wilkins

Natural Product Processing

We specialise in processing natural products from dairy, agriculture, horticulture and biological organisms. We have expertise in meat and blood processing, refrigeration, freeze drying, packaging food, food manufacture, and processing natural fibres for composite materials. We also have expertise in separating and purifying proteins using chromatography and other processes.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Janis Swan
Kim Pickering
Michael Walmsley
Johan Verbeek
James Carson
Mark Lay

Radiocarbon Dating

The Waikato Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory is a national radiocarbon facility undertaking both Standard Radiometric Dating and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Dating (AMS). We are a part of the Faculty of Science & Engineering at the University of Waikato.

For more than 30 years we have been providing radiocarbon assays for scientists and researchers from around the world and have been at the forefront of ground-breaking research into the technique and its application.

The Waikato laboratory has a commitment to customer service, innovation, and continual improvement.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Alan Hogg
Fiona Petchey

Range Imaging

High precision full-field simultaneous acquisition of range images.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Cree
Adrian Dorrington
Rainer Künnemeyer

Remote Sensing

Remote sensing means retrieving Earth surface and atmospheric properties via electromagnetic sensor carried on board satellites and aircraft. Present research examines applications of remote sensing techniques to agriculture, forestry, weather and climate. We are using data from AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer), SeaWiFs (sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor), and aerial colour-infrared photography. We are particularly interested in determining sea surface temperatures, atmospheric water vapour and cloud properties from the satellite sensed radiances. We are also involved in the development of more accurate satellite calibration methods. Theoretical work is proceeding on scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ocean waves. This allows determination of surface winds.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Moira Steyn-Ross
Alistair Steyn-Ross

Retinal Imaging

The Waikato Retinal Imaging Group is exploring pattern recognition techniques to analyse and quantify the features of diabetic retinopathy in non-mydriatic colour fundus images. The ultimate aim is to develop a system capable of automated screening of the retinae of diabetic persons for diabetic retinopathy.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Michael Cree

Science Education

Science Education research involves the study of the teach and learning of science. Members of the department are currently researching in the areas of biology education and environmental education, at tertiary, secondary and primary education levels. They are also studying student understanding of the nature of science, particularly with reference to evolution and cell biology.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Alison Campbell
Chris Eames
Craig Cary

Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology

The sedimentary geology group is working in petroleum exploration with the hydrocarbon exploration industry in New Zealand, both in the productive Taranaki Basin and in frontier basins to make commercial discoveries. Staff are also researching North Island geology; siliclastic sedimentology; carbonate sedimentology; sequence stratigaphy; paleoenvironmental analysis.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Peter Kamp
Cam Nelson
Rochelle Hansen

Soil Science

The Faculty's research in the soil sciences comprises a wide range of subdisciplines, such as:

  • Pedology and paleopedology
  • Soils and environmental protection
  • Soils and waste management, Antarctic soils and environment
  • Soil water and microclimates and functioning of peat and organic soils

Academic staff researching in this area:
David Lowe
Megan Balks
Louis Schipper
Dave Campbell

Solar Engineering

Our research group investigates how solar energy can be used in buildings to reduce the use of gas and mains electricity. A major research area is Building Integrated Photovoltaic/Thermal (BIPVT) systems where the systems that harvest solar energy are integrated directly into the roof or façade of a building. A number of innovative new ideas are under investigation in partnership with a number of New Zealand and overseas companies.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Mike Duke
James Carson
Rainer Künnemeyer
C K Au

Thermophiles

Historically, the Thermophile Research Unit was set up to study the micro-organisms that lived in hot pools and other thermal environments. It now encompasses organisms living in all environmental extremes (heat, cold, low and high pH, high salt etc). The aims are to study the diversity of organisms in these environments and their molecular adaptations to the environmental extreme. Underlying features of protein stability, enzyme activity membrane function for example are more easily understood by studying examples covering a broad spectrum of environmental range. Our collections of organisms, genes and enzymes from extreme environments is also an attractive resource to screen for activities of use in biotechnology.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Hugh Morgan
Roy Daniel
Craig Cary

Volcanology

Volcanological research has focused on physical volcanology, magmatic processes, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks, volcanic hazards and risk mitigation, tephrochronology and radiometric dating.

Volcanological studies have been particularly aimed at increasing our knowledge and understanding of volcanism in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, and late Miocene-Pliocene Coromandel Volcanic Zone and other Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic rocks of the northern North Island.

Find out more about volcanoes in Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Academic staff researching in this area:
Roger Briggs

Zoology

Zoology is the study of animals - their taxonomy, structure, physiology, development, behaviour, ecology and evolution.

Academic staff researching in this area:
Carolyn King
Joseph Waas
Ian Hogg
Ian Duggan
Nick Ling

Partnerships

The Faculty has collaborated with a number of external institutions in advancing research both nationally and internationally. Some of these include:

BOP Polytechnic

Te Whare Wananga

Hill Laboratories

Scion Crown Research Institute

Dow AgroSciences

Institute of Environmental Science and Research

Department of Conservation | Te Papa Atawhai

Logo der Universität Bremen

Bay of Plenty Regional Council Logo

NIWA - Taihoro Nukurangi - National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

Waikato Regional Council

Port of Tauranga logo

Plant & Food Research

Agilent Technologies

AgResearch

Fletcher Aluminium

Titanium Industry Development Association (TiDA)

Millennium Plastics

Contact the Faculty

Science & Engineering contacts
0800 438 254
Address + Map

Faculty Research

Bovine bone replacement:
Waste material from cattle processing could one day be responsible for shorter healing times and stronger bones for joint replacement and bone graft patients.

Faculty People

Associate Professor Rainer Künnemeyer
Associate Professor