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yes, we have some bananas - just not gm ones (yet)

Back in 2010 I wrote a post about bananas, following on from a Schol Bio question the previous year. As well as looking at the genotypes of modern bananas, I highlighted the fact that the original wild banana was not a particularly appetising object, with little flesh and a lot of large, hard seeds. Selective breeding for the win!!!

Anyway, it seems like at least one anti-GMO Facebook group has got a case of the vapours about 'GMO bananas', this being the only explanation some of its members could think of for the fibres that you'll often see in the skin of a not-completely-ripe banana when you twist & pull the stalk end. Kevin Folta picked this up in a blog post, noting the lack of knowledge of some of the commenters there (I haven't quite decided if the one about Morgellon's is a poe...) - but as Robert Sacerich notes, one of those commenters is giving an object lesson in how NOT to do science communication, & doesn't help the cause. 

And no, we have no GM bananas - at the moment. Sacerich points out that there's work in progress on developing GM plants that are resistant to the major threats to banana production (Black Sigatoka disease, Banana Bunchy Top virus, and bacterial infections). So such plants may well become a reality in the relatively near future.

But that will have nothing to do with the fibres that so concerned those anti-GMO commenters; they've always been with us & were apparently used in cloth production in Japan as early as the 1200s, a practice that's seen something of a recent resurgence. (I didn't know that! You learn something new every day.)

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